August 29, 2017 (Initial Announcement) Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Agbeni Infections Linked to Pet Turtles

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=347352

People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agbeni, by state of residence, as of August 25, 2017

  • CDC and multiple states are investigating a multistate outbreak of human Salmonella infections linked to contact with pet turtles.
  • Thirty-seven people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agbeni have been reported from 13 states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 1, 2017 to August 3, 2017
    • Of 33 people with available information, 16 have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.
    • Twelve (32%) ill people are children 5 years of age or younger.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory findings link the outbreak of human Salmonella Agbeni infections to contact with turtles or their environments, such as water from a turtle habitat.
    • In interviews, ill people answered questions about contact with animals during the week before becoming ill. Fifteen (45%) of the 33 people interviewed reported contact with turtles or their environments, such as water from a turtle habitat, before getting sick.
    • In interviews with 9 ill people about where their turtles came from, 6 reported buying a turtle from a flea market or street vendor, or receiving the turtle as a gift.
    • In 2015, state and local health officials collected samples from turtles at a street vendor. Whole genome sequencing showed that the Salmonella Agbeni isolated from ill people in this outbreak is closely related genetically to the Salmonella Agbeni isolates from turtles. This close genetic relationship means that people in this outbreak are more likely to share a common source of infection.
  • Do not buy small turtles as pets or give them as gifts.
  • All turtles, regardless of size, can carry Salmonella bacteria even if they look healthy and clean. These outbreaks are a reminder to follow simple steps to enjoy pet reptiles and keep your family healthy.
  • This outbreak is expected to continue since consumers might be unaware of the risk of Salmonella infection from small turtles. If properly cared for, turtles have a long life expectancy.

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September 1, 2017 (Investigation Update) Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=347351

People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Kiambu, by state of residence, as of August 30, 2017

  • Read the Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers >>
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.
  • This outbreak includes four different types of Salmonella: Thompson, Kiambu, Agona, and Gaminara. The same strain of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.
  • A total of 201 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (131), Salmonella Kiambu (57), Salmonella Agona (8), or Salmonella Gaminara (5) have been reported from 23 states.
    • Sixty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • Two additional outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to imported papayas from two other farms in Mexico, Caraveo Produce and El Zapotanito, have been identified. Available information indicates that illnesses in these two outbreaks are not linked to papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm and are being investigated separately.
  • CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche, Caraveo Produce, or El Zapotanito farms in Mexico.
    • If you aren’t sure if the papaya you bought is a Maradol papaya from one of these farms, ask the place of purchase. Restaurants and retailers can ask their suppliers.
    • When in doubt, don’t eat, sell, or serve papayas; just throw them out.
    • Wash and sanitize countertops as well as drawers or shelves in refrigerators where Maradol papayas were stored.
  • Because three separate outbreaks linked to papayas from different farms have been identified, CDC is concerned that papayas from several other farms in Mexico might be contaminated with Salmonella and have made people sick.
  • FDA continues testing papayas from Mexico to see if other papayas from other farms are contaminated with Salmonella. Investigations are ongoing to determine if additional consumer warnings are needed beyond the advice not to eat papayas from specific farms that is given in this update. CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

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February 20, 2018 (Initial Announcement) Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- Infections Linked to Kratom

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=355796

Read the Advice to Consumers
At this time, CDC recommends that people not consume kratom in any form because it could be contaminated with Salmonella.

CDC’s recommendation may change as more information becomes available.
Kratom is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketom, and Biak.
Kratom is a plant consumed for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute.

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- infections.
Epidemiologic evidence indicates that kratom is a likely source of this multistate outbreak.

Ill people in this outbreak report consuming kratom in pills, powder, or tea.
No common brands or suppliers of kratom products have been identified at this time.
Because no common source of Salmonella-contaminated kratom has been identified, CDC is recommending against consuming any kratom.

Twenty-eight people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- have been reported from 20 states.

Eleven hospitalizations have been reported.
No deaths have been reported.

This investigation is ongoing. CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

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