August 29, 2017 (Initial Announcement) Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Agbeni Infections Linked to Pet Turtles

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=347352

People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agbeni, by state of residence, as of August 25, 2017

  • CDC and multiple states are investigating a multistate outbreak of human Salmonella infections linked to contact with pet turtles.
  • Thirty-seven people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agbeni have been reported from 13 states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 1, 2017 to August 3, 2017
    • Of 33 people with available information, 16 have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.
    • Twelve (32%) ill people are children 5 years of age or younger.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory findings link the outbreak of human Salmonella Agbeni infections to contact with turtles or their environments, such as water from a turtle habitat.
    • In interviews, ill people answered questions about contact with animals during the week before becoming ill. Fifteen (45%) of the 33 people interviewed reported contact with turtles or their environments, such as water from a turtle habitat, before getting sick.
    • In interviews with 9 ill people about where their turtles came from, 6 reported buying a turtle from a flea market or street vendor, or receiving the turtle as a gift.
    • In 2015, state and local health officials collected samples from turtles at a street vendor. Whole genome sequencing showed that the Salmonella Agbeni isolated from ill people in this outbreak is closely related genetically to the Salmonella Agbeni isolates from turtles. This close genetic relationship means that people in this outbreak are more likely to share a common source of infection.
  • Do not buy small turtles as pets or give them as gifts.
  • All turtles, regardless of size, can carry Salmonella bacteria even if they look healthy and clean. These outbreaks are a reminder to follow simple steps to enjoy pet reptiles and keep your family healthy.
  • This outbreak is expected to continue since consumers might be unaware of the risk of Salmonella infection from small turtles. If properly cared for, turtles have a long life expectancy.

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September 1, 2017 (Investigation Update) Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=347351

People infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Kiambu, by state of residence, as of August 30, 2017

  • Read the Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers >>
  • CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.
  • This outbreak includes four different types of Salmonella: Thompson, Kiambu, Agona, and Gaminara. The same strain of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.
  • A total of 201 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (131), Salmonella Kiambu (57), Salmonella Agona (8), or Salmonella Gaminara (5) have been reported from 23 states.
    • Sixty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.
  • Two additional outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to imported papayas from two other farms in Mexico, Caraveo Produce and El Zapotanito, have been identified. Available information indicates that illnesses in these two outbreaks are not linked to papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm and are being investigated separately.
  • CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche, Caraveo Produce, or El Zapotanito farms in Mexico.
    • If you aren’t sure if the papaya you bought is a Maradol papaya from one of these farms, ask the place of purchase. Restaurants and retailers can ask their suppliers.
    • When in doubt, don’t eat, sell, or serve papayas; just throw them out.
    • Wash and sanitize countertops as well as drawers or shelves in refrigerators where Maradol papayas were stored.
  • Because three separate outbreaks linked to papayas from different farms have been identified, CDC is concerned that papayas from several other farms in Mexico might be contaminated with Salmonella and have made people sick.
  • FDA continues testing papayas from Mexico to see if other papayas from other farms are contaminated with Salmonella. Investigations are ongoing to determine if additional consumer warnings are needed beyond the advice not to eat papayas from specific farms that is given in this update. CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

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February 20, 2018 (Initial Announcement) Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- Infections Linked to Kratom

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=355796

Read the Advice to Consumers
At this time, CDC recommends that people not consume kratom in any form because it could be contaminated with Salmonella.

CDC’s recommendation may change as more information becomes available.
Kratom is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketom, and Biak.
Kratom is a plant consumed for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute.

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- infections.
Epidemiologic evidence indicates that kratom is a likely source of this multistate outbreak.

Ill people in this outbreak report consuming kratom in pills, powder, or tea.
No common brands or suppliers of kratom products have been identified at this time.
Because no common source of Salmonella-contaminated kratom has been identified, CDC is recommending against consuming any kratom.

Twenty-eight people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:b:- have been reported from 20 states.

Eleven hospitalizations have been reported.
No deaths have been reported.

This investigation is ongoing. CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

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164 with Salmonella in 35 States – 63 Hospitalized and 1 Death

https://www.salmonellablog.com/salmonella-outbreaks/164-with-salmonella-in-35-states-63-hospitalized-and-1-death/

As of November 5, 2018, 164 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading have been reported from 35 states.

Illnesses started on dates from November 20, 2017, to October 20, 2018. Ill people range in age from less than one year to 91, with a median age of 45. Fifty-six percent of ill people are female. Of 135 people with information available, 63 (47%) have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from California.

State and local health departments continue to interview ill people about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 85 people interviewed, 44 (52%) people interviewed reported preparing or eating turkey products that were purchased raw, including ground turkey, turkey pieces, and whole turkey. Ill people reported buying many different brands of raw turkey products from multiple stores. Also, 3 of the 85 ill people interviewed became sick after pets in their home ate raw ground turkey pet food. Three of the 85 ill people interviewed worked in a facility that raises or processes turkeys, or lived with someone who did.

The outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading has been identified in samples from raw turkey pet food in Minnesota, from live turkeys from several states, and from raw turkey products collected from ill people’s homes. The raw turkey samples collected from ill people’s homes are still being investigated to determine the source of the turkey.

The outbreak strain was also identified in samples from raw turkey products from 22 slaughter and 7 processing establishments. The samples collected by FSIS at these slaughter and processing establishments were part of FSIS’s routine testing under the Salmonella performance standards. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) showed that the Salmonella strain isolated from these samples is closely related genetically to the Salmonella strain from ill people. This result provides more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from preparing raw turkey products.

Jennie-O Turkey Store Sales, LLC, a Barron, Wis. establishment, is recalling approximately 91,388 pounds of raw ground turkey products that may be associated with an illness outbreak of Salmonella Reading, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The raw ground turkey products items were produced on September 11, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O GROUND TURKEY 93% LEAN | 7% FAT” with “Use by” dates of 10/01/2018 and 10/02/2018.
  • 1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O TACO SEASONED GROUND TURKEY” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018.
  • 1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O GROUND TURKEY 85% LEAN | 15% FAT” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018.
  • 1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O ITALIAN SEASONED GROUND TURKEY” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-190” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

FSIS, and its public health partners, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Arizona Department of Health Services, have been conducting traceback activities for a sample of Jennie-O brand ground turkey in an intact, unopened package from a case-patient’s home. The patient tested positive for Salmonella Reading and the sample from the ground turkey matches the outbreak strain.

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March 6, 2018, Investigation Notice: Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis Infections Linked to Pet Guinea Pigs

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=382251

CDC, several states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections. CDC began investigating in December 2017 when CDC PulseNet identified a cluster of three Salmonella Enteritidis infections that whole genome sequencing showed were closely related genetically. A review of the PulseNet database identified six more closely related illnesses dating back to 2015. These illnesses were added to the outbreak case count. Nine people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from eight states.

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Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Ground Turkey Spikes

https://www.salmonellablog.com/salmonella-watch/salmonella-outbreak-linked-to-ground-turkey-spikes/

Since the last update on November 8, 2018, 52 ill people from 26 states and the District of Columbia have been added to this investigation. As of December 18, 2018, 216 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading have been reported from 38 states and the District of Columbia. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page.

Illnesses started on dates from November 20, 2017, to December 6, 2018. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 99, with a median age of 40. Fifty-five percent of ill people are female. Of 175 people with information available, 84 (48%) have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from California.

Whole genome sequencing analysis (WGS) did not identify predicted antibiotic resistance in 132 isolates from 61 ill people and 71 food and animal samples. However, 80 isolates from ill people and 97 isolates from food, animal, and environmental samples contained genes for resistance or decreased susceptibility to all or some of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, kanamycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, and fosfomycin. Testing of six outbreak isolates using standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory confirmed these results. Most of the infections in this outbreak are susceptible to the antibiotics that are commonly used for treatment, so this resistance likely will not affect the choice of antibiotic used to treat most people.

State and local health departments continue to interview ill people about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Fifty-eight (54%) of the 108 ill people interviewed reported preparing or eating turkey products that were purchased raw, including ground turkey, turkey pieces, and whole turkey. Ill people reported buying many different brands of raw turkey products from multiple stores. Also, 3 of the 108 ill people interviewed became sick after pets in their home ate raw ground turkey pet food. Four of the 108 ill people interviewed worked in a facility that raises or processes turkeys, or lived with someone who did.

Public health officials in Arizona and Michigan collected unopened Jennie-O brand ground turkey from the homes of two ill people. WGS showed that Salmonella bacteria isolated from the ill persons and from the ground turkey were closely related genetically. This result provides more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from eating turkey.

On November 15, 2018, Jennie-O Turkey Store Sales, LLC, in Barron, Wisconsin recalledapproximately 91,388 pounds of raw ground turkey products. On December 21, 2018, Jennie-O Turkey Store Sales, LLC, in Faribault, Minnesota recalled approximately 164,210 pounds of raw ground turkey products.

Ill people in this outbreak report buying many different brands of raw turkey products from multiple stores. Available data indicate that this strain of Salmonella Reading may be present in live turkeys and in raw turkey products. A single, common supplier of raw turkey products or of live turkeys has not been identified that could account for the whole outbreak.

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May 18, 2018, Final Update: Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium Infections Linked to Dried Coconut

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=382250

As of May 18, 2018, this outbreak appears to be over. Do not eat recalled dried coconut products. Retailers should not sell or serve recalled dried coconut products. These products have a long shelf life and may still be in people’s homes. Throw it away or return it to the place of purchase for a refund. Several grocery store and retail locations received recalled bulk packages of International Harvest, Inc. brand Go Smiles Dried Coconut Raw.

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June 8, 2018, Investigation Notice: Multistate Outbreaks of Salmonella Infections Linked to Contact with Live Poultry in Backyard Flocks, 2018

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=382248

CDC and a number of countries are investigating several multistate outbreaks of Salmonella infections related to contact with poultry in backyard flocks. A Number of Different types of Salmonella germs have made people sick: Salmonella Seftenberg, Salmonella Montevideo, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Indiana, and Salmonella Litchfield.

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June 14, 2018, Final Update: Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Braenderup Infections Linked to Rose Acre Farms Shell Eggs

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=382249

As of June 14, 2018, this outbreak appears to be finished. CDC, public health and regulatory officials in many states, along with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) researched a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Braenderup infections associated with Rose Acre Farms shell eggs. Forty-five people infected with the epidemic strain of Salmonella Braenderup were reported in 10 states.

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June 19, 2018, Investigation Update: Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide Infections Linked to Pre-Cut Melon

https://tools.cdc.gov/podcasts/download.asp?m=342774&c=382247

On June 8, 2018, Caito Foods, LLC recalled pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and berry medley products containing melons produced at the Caito Foods center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Recalled products were offered in plastic clamshell containers. The FDA has a list of stores and countries where recalled pre-cut melons and fruit cakes were offered. The recalled products were sold at many diverse shops and carry many unique labels. Don’t consume remembered products. Check your refrigerator and freezer and toss them away or return them into the place of purchase for a purchase.

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